11/17/2015

Italy and the German Unification 1989/1990

The unification process between the two German states began on November 9, 1989. The event was a watershed not only for German history but also for the European integration project and thereby all Germany's neighbors, including Italy. From the German perspective this process has been thoroughly investigated. The responses of the major powers as well as Britain and France are likewise well researched. To the present day, however, the Italian reaction is insufficiently documented. Who were the protagonists, what tensions existed within the country? What preparations had been made for the developments in Germany? What influence was sought, what was considered negotiable – and what was non-negotiable? What resources could Italy mobilize? What fears, expectations or hopes were linked to the transformation process between the two German states? These questions are at the core of a multi-perspective analysis incorporating Italian perceptions as well as those in Central and Eastern Europe. It focuses not only on Italian government policy and diplomacy but also perceptions of the media and reactions from the business community and society. This view to the southern periphery of the Atlantic Alliance opens up new insights into the ambivalence of the Cold War's final phase and the equally diverse and contradictory dynamics of German-Italian relations.

Deborah Cuccia, M.A., historian, is a PhD student at the University of Florence. She presented her dissertation project on November 17, 2015, at the Berlin Center's 1st Brown Bag Breakfast.

 

Recommended Citation:
Deborah Cuccia, Italy and the German Unification 1989/1990, 11/17/2015, http://berlinerkolleg.com/en/blog/italy-and-german-unification-19891990 (please add the date of the last call to this page in brackets)

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